Poems have a lilt to them and it needs to be felt. Even though I have given my views for this poetry book, Silent Sun by Ayushman Jamwal, I would urge you to go ahead and feel the words, soak yourself in them and allow them take you on a beautiful sojourn.

Ayushman Jamwal’s anthology of poems, Silent Sun, published by BecomeShakespeare.com is a very short read. However, the poems are heavy, resounding and stay with you for long after you have done reading it. The book consists of 20 poems, each tackling a different issue and each poem evoking a different emotion in us, readers. Every word is chosen to render perfection to the sentence. The placement of the words enhances the reading experience twofold. The language is succinct and lucid. Some poems are penned in spoken word style. And it feels very natural when we read.

My favourites from the book are

1. Tears of a wondering mystic
Something shifted inside me when I read a few lines of this poem. Death taking away the joy which was something you had been waiting for the longest time, been there, experienced and so I could relate to this poem more easily.


“You courted death when surrounded by joy.”


2. I think of you
It was heartwarming and quite romantic.

3. May the valley hear me roar
This one was very inspiring and gave me goosebumps.

4. Am I not a God’s child?
Such a simple question and yet so hard-hitting! Never has anyone ever, so succinctly, with a lilt, attacked the patriarchal system practised by Islam. This is first for me and it was simply mind-blowing.

5. Rama’s lament
I have read so many books with Sita as a lead, from Sita’s perspective but never has anyone looked at Rama so emphatically. He lost his love and his family. Never do we try to look at Rama as a human being. This was another poem that gave me goosebumps.

Though these are my favourite yet other poems too make you ponder.

Tip: Read out these poems loud and you will see that the words leave you stunned, surprised and pleasant.

To buy the product click https://amzn.to/2XrzJgT

Publisher: BecomeShakespeare.com